Monthly Archives: July 2019

How Can I Get My Book Reviewed?

You may be wondering, “How can I get my book reviewed?” Different types of book reviews are available to help authors sell more books: unpaid traditional book reviews and paid online book reviews. Each has its own unique pros and cons. Both are effective tools for different reasons.

How Can I Get My Book Reviewed? [Unpaid Traditional Book Reviews]

Make sure to send out a few complimentary copies of your book to various relevant book reviewers in your area. This is a common custom among trade publishers that really should be adopted by self-publishing authors. Why? Because it is a great way to generate some extra publicity for your book.

The upside is that these reviews are free of charge in the sense that your only cost is the copy of your book and the postage to send it; however, the downside is that you’re not guaranteed a review after sending it. It’s at the discretion of the reviewer.

How can I get my book reviewed in Midwest Book Review?

Two types of unpaid traditional book reviews are available: one is the review that you send out ahead of time, known as an advance reading copy (ARC), to stir up interest in the book before publication; the other is a published review copy of the actual, final edited version of your book.

Advance Reading Copies (ARCs)

These unfinished review copies can be printed and mailed out as hard copy galleys or emailed as .PDF files. It is important to ensure they are stamped with the words “Advance Reading Copy (ARC)” on the front cover, and possibly also on every few pages of the interior, to ensure that the reviewer understands the copy is unedited so he or she takes that into account.

Published Review Copies

When sending a final published review copy to an editor, whether mailed as a hard copy or emailed as a .PDF, make sure to stamp “Review Copy” on the front cover of the book so it cannot be resold for profit. This also ensures that it will get to the right person at the newspaper or magazine to which you’re sending it for review.

How can I get my book reviewed in the Midwest Book Review Jim Cox Report?

A book review written by a respected reviewer within the literary community can do wonders to help boost book sales. It works in much the same way as other forms of publicity do. When shared via social media, a prize endorsement such as this can catch on as quickly as wildfire. It’s definitely worth the cost of a complimentary book or two.

How Can I Get My Book Reviewed? [Paid Online Book Reviews]

Paid online book reviews are a fantastic advertising tool for authors. They can aid you in your efforts to direct traffic to the storefront where your book is currently sold. As well, they can provide you with relevant content that can be shared via social media.

The upside to these types of reviews is that whereas you’re not guaranteed a review when you send a book to a traditional book reviewer, you are guaranteed a review when you pay for one from a non-traditional book reviewer. The downside is that you must pay for it.

Educational Resources for Authors

When completed by a reputable organization, these paid reviews are still unbiased reviews—which may be good or bad. Once the review is complete, you are given an opportunity to decline or approve it to be published online. If you decline it, you won’t get your money back; it simply won’t be shared publicly at your request. But if you approve it, it might be posted to that reviewer’s high-traffic website. Or, it could be posted to your book online.

A complimentary paid book review can boost your sales in much the same way a traditional review can. This can also improve your blog’s SEO. It is definitely worth the investment. To find links to the websites of various reviewers who may accept your book for review, click here and here and here.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Get Book Reviews. Sell More Books.

Why would you want to get book reviews for each of your books? In today’s publishing world, it’s less about impressing readers and more about search engine optimization (SEO).

Get-Book-Reviews.-Sell-More-Books.

Get Book Reviews. Sell More Books.

In a search engine’s eyes, if your books have more legitimate reviews than other authors’ books within the same genre, your social media sites have more followers, and each of your webpages (e.g., each individual post on your blog, each individual book on Amazon or Kobo, et cetera) have more click-throughs, then you must have more expertise and authority than other authors have. As a result, you’ll rank higher than they do. It’s all based on algorithms.

But expertise and authority are not enough. In fact, trust is an increasingly strong ranking factor for search engines like Google. Positive book reviews can help to build that sense of trust around your author brand.

Positive, legitimate book reviews such as these can also be used to increase the number of relevant backlinks to a particular webpage. This is worthy of a higher ranking in Google’s eyes, too.

What is a backlink? In a nutshell, backlinks are incoming links to a webpage. Relevant backlinks can increase the SEO of a webpage while also bringing it more quality traffic. What constitutes quality traffic? It is relevant visitors to your website—people who are looking for exactly the type of books and information that you offer. That’s what you really want.

Master Google to Master SEO

Why would you want to master Google, in particular? This search engine powers over 76% of all Internet searches according to this June 2019 NetMarketShare report. The same report shows China’s Baidu as second in line at almost 10%; so, that tells you the power of Google in helping you to sell more books.

All you need now is some guidance regarding how to optimize your search engine ranking on Google, for all your major keywords, so your desired readers can easily find you. You can find that here.

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Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors

Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors

Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors Book Reviews

“To be blunt, this is a fantastic resource for authors. … Staflund provides an accessible, engaging, and clear-cut series of steps to follow to increase sales. With a friendly tone and personal anecdotes, the book feels like a face-to-face coaching session that can be re-read at any time.” ~Pacific Book Review

“I’m something of an introvert myself so I was interested to see whether or not I would feel that I could be pushed beyond what I found tolerable, but I felt that if I was doing this I would be well within my comfort zone. … I came away believing that if I wanted to promote a book I would have a simple plan of action which I would be able to follow.” ~The Bookbag

“Both lighthearted and full of informative, practical advice, this guide to marketing for introverted authors is a gem.” ~ForeWord Reviews, Clarion Review

Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors is a ‘must-have’ for every author. Highly recommended.” ~Wisconsin Bookwatch (a division of MBR)

“…a critically important instructional reference — especially for reluctant, bashful, or introverted authors. … Informed, informative, and thoroughly ‘user friendly’ from beginning to end, ‘Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors’ should be considered a mandatory study for every novice author seeking to establish themselves in an economically supporting career. Indeed, it would not be amiss if every one of those aforementioned creative writing classes and workshops would add ‘Successful Selling Tips for Introverted Authors’ to their curriculum supplemental studies reading lists.” ~Midwest Book Review, Jim Cox Report

“If You Are An Introverted Author, This Is THE Book To Read To Promote Your Book. … None of these techniques involve hard selling in any way. And for people who love to write, but hate to sell, these techniques are a perfect match.” ~Claude Whitacre

Learn how to get your own book reviewed here.

Learn why book reviews are great for your blog site’s SEO.

SNEAK A PEEK INSIDE THIS BOOK HERE.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How to Publish a Bestselling Book … and Sell it WORLDWIDE Based on Value, Not Price!

How to Publish a Bestselling Book

How to Publish a Bestselling Book Book Reviews

“All facets of writing, publishing, and marketing are covered in this book through the voice of a publisher and entrepreneur, which gives Staflund’s book more credibility and value than many other guides on the market today.” ~Penn Book Review
** Penn Book Review by Elizabeth Smith-Gardiner, an academic writer and Communications professor currently teaching at the Texas A&M University (2014), who endorses How to Publish a Bestselling Book as future publishing course material. **

“…Staflund gives good advice and it’s remarkably far-reaching, considering that it covers several countries … [A]n enlightening, helpful book which gives you an excellent introduction to the business of publishing.” ~The Bookbag

“As a veteran of the publishing industry, Staflund certainly is an authoritative voice and provides helpful guidance in her newest book, How to Publish a Bestselling Book … [A] must-read for any writer hoping to publish their next book.” ~Hollywood Book Reviews

“Staflund’s respect for the writers at the heart of the publishing process makes this a worthwhile addition to any aspiring author’s bookshelf.” ~ForeWord Reviews, Clarion Review

“[T]here is a wealth of information within these pages. … Staflund holds nothing back, and because of that, How to Publish a Bestselling Book has the feel of a roadmap. Just follow it, and it will easily take you where you want to go.” ~Pacific Book Review

“…exceptional, practical, detailed, comprehensive, and thoroughly ‘user friendly’ from beginning to end.” ~Midwest Book Review

Learn how to get your own book reviewed here.

Learn why book reviews are great for your blog site’s SEO.

SNEAK A PEEK INSIDE THIS BOOK HERE.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



How to Publish a Book in Canada … and Sell Enough Copies to Make a Profit!

How to Publish a Book in Canada

How to Publish a Book in Canada Book Reviews

​“Staflund’s stated goal is to give Canadian authors insight into what it takes to produce a salable book in Canada, get it into the hands of the desired demographic, and earn a healthy profit in the process. In this, she has succeeded admirably.” ~ForeWord Reviews, Clarion Review

“A good source for writers of all experience levels seeking to publish quality books in Canada.” ~Kirkus Reviews

“This book is a real, and I mean real, learning tool … You will know how to do what the title states when you finish Kim Staflund’s book.” ~Palmetto Review

How to Publish a Book in Canada is a very instructive book for any author—in and out of Canada. Though the book is specifically for Canadian authors, writers from any country will gain insight from this book.” ~Pacific Book Review

“Staflund’s personal stories, humor, and examples throughout makes this book entertaining as well as instructional . . . How to Publish a Book in Canada is a great investment for future publishers—both in Canada and outside of Canada.” ~Penn Book Review

“This is the first book I’ve read where the author has put in a tremendous amount of research into the book … All writers must have a copy at the side of their writing desks.” ~Inkspand

Learn how to get your own book reviewed here.

Learn why book reviews are great for your blog site’s SEO.

SNEAK A PEEK INSIDE THIS BOOK HERE.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Choosing Illustrations, Graphics, or Images for Your Book

When choosing illustrations, graphics, or images for your book cover—or in your book’s interior, for that matter—you must ensure you have the legal right to use them.

Choosing Illustrations, Graphics, or Images for Your Book

There are three ways you can do this:

  • one, you can use illustrations, graphics, or images that you have personally created and therefore own the copyright to;
  • two, you can purchase the right to use artwork created by someone else;
  • or three, you can find public domain stock photos that are deemed as “free for commercial use” from whatever design-template program you are using, or from websites such as Pixabay.com, as I did for this blog post.

Actually, I use Pixabay graphics for most of my blog posts. I always seem to be able to find what I’m looking for there.

Choosing Illustrations, Graphics, or Images for Your Book

It is crucial to respect another artist’s copyright. If you don’t—if you just pull any image file you find off the Internet and use that for your book without first confirming you have the right to use it—you may find yourself involved in an expensive copyright infringement lawsuit down the road. This isn’t only about protecting the rights of other artists; it’s also about protecting yourself. So, do a little research before you use any images for your books. Pixabay is one of many websites containing free stock photos. You can find even more resources here: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-internet-marketing-discussion-forum/1257937-avoid-copyright-infringement-use-tool-find-free-stock-photos-your-display-ads.html.

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

Printers and publishers have a lot in common in terms of what their graphic designers will and won’t do. Today’s post will help you understand why.

Printers and Publishers: What Their Graphic Designers Will and Won’t Do for You

First and foremost, I’m referring to hybrid publishers as opposed to traditional (trade) publishers here. When traditional publishers purchase the rights to publish your manuscript, they are also buying full creative control of the book. That means they will make all the graphic design decisions on your behalf. You won’t have much say in anything. But in the self-publishing and hybrid publishing business models, you retain full copyright ownership of the book. As such, you also retain your creative control and must make all the design decisions for yourself. (You can learn more about today’s three primary book publishing methods by clicking here.)

Printers and Publishers Won’t Make Graphic Design Decisions on Your Behalf

Printers and Publishers Need to Know This

Twice in the last ten years, I took on projects from authors who said they had no idea how they wanted their book covers to look. I pressed them for details with various leading questions. But they both insisted they didn’t know what they wanted. They asked me to have my graphic designer supply them with two sample layouts to choose from without providing any real instructions ahead of time. I cringed. I knew where this was headed. But I obliged and asked my designer to create two sample layouts based on the little information we had: the type of book, topic matter, and stated demographic.

In both cases, the designers did their best and came up with what I considered to be beautiful, professional designs. But, not surprisingly, both authors hated the sample layouts. “That’s not what I had in mind,” they both complained. It had been a giant waste of everyone’s time.

You see, even if you think you don’t know what you want, you still do to some degree. And this is important information to provide the graphic designers of both printers and publishers ahead of time.

When deciding how you would like your book’s cover and interior to appear, it’s best to browse a bookstore (whether in person or online) and view the many different examples there first. What designs, colours, and fonts draw your attention? Write down the book titles and author names, so you can use this as a handy visual reference when it comes time to provide a description to the graphic designer. This will help the process run much more smoothly for both of you.

You can download the above book completely free of charge to obtain a check-list of the types of information graphic designers will need from you upfront. Just click on the cover image to be redirected to where it can be downloaded. I highly recommend you read it.

Printers and Publishers Won’t Choose Graphics for You Free of Charge

3 Book Printing Tips for Indie Authors

If you want to include any illustrations, graphics, or images on your book cover—or in your book’s interior, for that matter—you must ensure you have the legal right to use them. There are three ways you can do this: one, you can use photos, illustrations, or graphics that you have personally created and therefore own the copyright to; two, you can purchase them from someone else; or three, you can find public domain stock photos that are deemed as “free for commercial use” and download those. Either way, it’s best if you to provide these files to printers and publishers ahead of time. Otherwise, you’ll spend a lot more money paying them to create or find these files on your behalf.

Click here for more information regarding where and how to find public domain stock photos for yourself. Always respect another artist’s copyright. If you don’t—if you just pull any image file you find off the Internet and use that for your book without first confirming you have the right to use it—you may find yourself involved in an expensive copyright infringement lawsuit down the road.

Printers and Publishers Won’t Choose Paper Stock for You Without Some Input

I fully understand the inclination of an author to say, “Just use the standard interior and cover stock,” when asked what type of paper you want used for your paperback or hardcover books. I get it. You’re thinking that printers and publishers are the experts, so they should know what you need in this regard. Here’s the problem with that: there is no one standard.

As you’re browsing through the bookstore to determine your design preferences, take note of all the different types of books in front of you. Notice how some books are thicker than others. Some covers are glossy and shiny; others are dull. Some interior pages are thin while others are thick. The colours vary. The sizes vary. Everything varies! (Choice is a wonderful thing. But it can also be a bit of a nightmare at times.)

When you’re browsing the bookstore, take note of the types of cover and interior paper stocks that appeal to you most. Take photos of your preferences. Better yet, bring physical samples to show printers and publishers when it comes time to place your order with them.

Printers and Publishers Will Sit Down With You to Discuss All These Details and Make Recommendations

Here’s one more thing printers and publishers have in common: they want to make you happy. When you’re happy, they’re happy!

Once you’ve visited the bookstore and gotten an idea of what you’re looking for, your next best course of action is to book a graphic design meeting to discuss your findings. Ask questions, listen to the recommendations, then make your decisions from there.

Printers and publishers are here to help you create the best book possible. But they need you to help them help you by doing some homework ahead of time. Trust me, it will save you time and money in the long run.

Related reading: Why Do Authors Need Graphic Designers?

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2018 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



PPG Graphic Design Style Guide

The PPG Graphic Design Style Guide was created to ensure all our graphic designers follow the same professional standards for all our books. Each vendor we hire must follow these guidelines.

1. The bar code is always placed on bottom right-hand corner of the back cover and PPG logos should appear as shown in this image:

PPG Graphic Design Style Guide

2. The gutter and margins should be set as shown here to ensure proper spacing in final printed book:

Gutter and margins for PPG books

3. When doing initial design samples for clients, send only two samples each of both the entire cover and one interior chapter. The entire cover includes the back cover, spine, and front cover as shown above. The sample chapter should include the title page and a couple extra sample pages to show the client how the margins, headers, footers, fonts, and spacing might appear.

4. Here is a link to the cover generator (barcode generator) that Ingram Content Group (Lightning Source) uses for its books: https://myaccount.lightningsource.com/Portal/Tools/CoverTemplateGenerator. Please use this tool to generate all book cover templates for PPG paperbacks and hardcover books. It will provide the most accurate spine measurement as it factors in LSI’s chosen paper weights here.

Page counts have to be guesstimated in the beginning since we won’t know the final page count until the final version of the book has been completed, so here is a guideline to use when generating a cover template. Typically, there are 300 words on a page (in the average non-fiction/fiction book). So, if a raw manuscript is 50,000 words long, assume that the book will be 167 pages, plus another 13 pages to account for front matter and back matter, for a total of 180 pages. Always round page counts up to the nearest even number. Build the first draft of the cover for this number of pages. Change it as needed as the book changes.

5. Never include a price on a PPG book cover. Only include the barcode excluding the price.

6. Only make the author’s/editor’s/proofreader’s exact changes to a manuscript. Never make judgment calls regarding punctuation or spelling or anything other than graphic design. Punctuation and spelling are the editor’s and proofreader’s jobs. Graphic design is the graphic designer’s job.

English is far from being a simple, straightforward language. There are many different editorial style guides associated with the English language, depending on which country an editor is representing: United Kingdom, Canada, the United States of America, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. We all have different ways of spelling and punctuating the English language, so we each use different editorial style guides when editing books.

For this reason, PPG creates a customized editorial style sheet for all our authors—to ensure consistency in editing for each and every one of their books. Since this sheet is only shared with the editor, proofreader, and author, it is impossible for the graphic designer to know which style is being used or make any editorial recommendations.

7. Eliminate all visible widows, orphans, and bad breaks from both the back-cover and internal copy of the book. (You may not find them all, and that’s okay. Just do your best. The proofreader will find the rest.)

A book’s interior is usually either justified or flush left as shown in the diagram below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typographic_alignment

If you choose justified alignment for your interior, then you have to be especially concerned with bad breaks in words. For example:

http://nitens.org/img/latex/hyphenation.jpg

The words “curious” and “remember” are badly broken up in the above sample. To avoid this, you can kern that particular block of text either slightly looser or slightly tighter to ensure the full words land on one line rather than breaking up into two lines. Believe me when I say that extra little detail can subliminally affect the quality of your book in other people’s eyes. It takes no time at all to fix it, so I highly recommend that you do.

Widows and orphans are a concern whether your text is justified or flush left as shown in the below image:

http://www.edgee.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/widow-orphan.png

As shown above, a widow is a lone word stuck on a line by itself anywhere in a page; whereas, an orphan is a lone one or two words that have landed by themselves on a line, up on the next page. Both of these things affect the flow and professional appearance of a book whether you realize it or not. Professional publishers always ensure these types of issues are eliminated by meticulously kerning certain blocks of text throughout the book (as opposed to adding in extra line breaks or paragraph breaks in random places to try to correct the issue).

Related reading: PPG Work-Made-for-Hire Vendor Agreement

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



PPG Canadian Editorial Style Guide

The PPG Canadian Editorial Style Guide was created as a starting point for our editors. It is used for all PPG authors who haven’t requested another specific editorial style guide for their books.

PPG Canadian Editorial Style Guide

Obviously, English is far from being a simple, straightforward language. There are many different editorial style guides associated with the English language, depending on which country an editor is representing: United Kingdom, Canada, the United States of America, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. We all have different ways of spelling and punctuating the English language, so we each use different editorial style guides when editing books.

This is why PPG creates a customized editorial style sheet for all our authors—to ensure consistency in editing for each and every one of their books. The styles are driven, first and foremost, by the author’s preference (if any) as to which primary guide he or she wishes to use (e.g., The Oxford Style Manual for British authors, The Chicago Manual of Style for American authors, a special blend of the two for Canadian authors as shown below). From there, the customized editorial style sheet is created by a book project’s primary editor, and everyone else follows that editor’s lead for every single book published by that author going forward.

PPG Canadian Editorial Style Guide

Spelling and Spelling References

A-B-C-D-E

Use behaviour and behavioural, not behavior and behavioral

Use clamour, not clamor; but write clamorous, not clamourous

Use colour (and colourful); not color or colorful

 

Er and ‘er: Use the word “er” to denote a speech filler, but use ‘er to denote an informal contraction of “her”: e.g., Oh, er, bring the truck ‘round to the gas pump and fill ‘er up.

 

 

F-G-H-I-J

Use favour (and favourite), not favor or favorite

Use flavour (and flavouring) not flavor or flavoring

Use humour, not humor; but  write humorous, not humourous

K-L-M-N-O

Use labour, not labor; but write laborious, not labourious

Use metre, not meter

 

 

 

P-Q-R-S-T

Use savour, not savor

Use TV, not T.V. (plural is TVs)

 

U-V-W-X-Y-Z

 

English Spelling/Translations

Generally, Canadian spelling uses “our” for words such as labour, humour, etc, but there are a few exceptions: sailor, tailor. Also, some “our” words drop the “u” when a suffix such as “ious” is added: e.g., laborious, not labourious

 

Words such as “center” and “meter” use “re” in Canadian spelling: e.g., centre, metre

Grammar and Punctuation

Style Guide(s) Used

Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) 16th Edition

 

Oxford Guide to Writing English: The Canadian Handbook

 

“Numbers in Fiction” The Editor’s Blog (Beth Hill, January 25, 2013)

http://theeditorsblog.net/2013/01/13/numbers-in-fiction/

 

Abbreviations and Acronyms

As per The Editor’s Blog, avoid using abbreviations for units of measure and rates of speed (especially for dialogue within the story), if possible. See blog post for examples.

 

For acronyms, spell out the words (or meaning of the acronym) in full the first time an acronym is used.

Capitalization

Capitalize names and do not place quotation marks around the names of other animals: e.g., write Lucky, not “Lucky”.

 

Capitalize brand names and manufacturers.

Dates and Time

As per The Editor’s Blog, avoid using ordinal numbers (e.g., 1st, 30th) for dates that include the month or month and year.

 

Ex. Write first of June, not June 1st or 1st of June. (Also avoid using superscripts with ordinal numbers in dates; e.g., write 25th, not 25th.)

Dictionary Used

Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English

 

Design (Info re layout, font, margins, trim size, etc.) Italics (as per CMOS)

Use italics to denote unfamiliar foreign words or phrases (or foreign sounding words and phrases; e.g., Genus Humanitas or Genius Humanitas); rather than italics and quotation marks.

 

Italics (or boldface type) can also be used (sparingly) to show emphasis.

Numbers

As per the PPG Style Guide, spell out numbers from zero to nine, and write the numerals for anything greater than nine (e.g., 10 not ten).

 

Exceptions:  Write the numbers as words when writing dialogue. (Source: “Numbers in Fiction”, The Editor’s Blog)

Punctuation

 

Quotation Marks

Quotation marks may be used to signal that a word is being used in an unusual way or to denote sarcasm or irony. (Note: The Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) discourages frequent use of quotation marks for this purpose. Where quotations are used to introduce an unusual phrase or jargon, CMOS recommends dropping the quotation marks for subsequent uses of the same word or phrase.)

 

Use quotation marks around a word or term when you are referring to it as a word.

Symbols

As per The Editor’s Blog, write out the words for symbols: e.g., use dollar, not $, percent, not %; degrees not °, etc., especially for dialogue.

URLs (as per PPG Style Guide)

Write urls in lowercase letters

Related reading: PPG Work-Made-for-Hire Vendor Agreement

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As a user of this website, you are authorized only to view, copy, print, and distribute the documents on this website so long as: one (1) the document is used for informational purposes only; and two (2) any copy of the document (or portion thereof) includes the following copyright notice: Copyright © 2019 Polished Publishing Group (PPG). All rights reserved.



Why Do All Authors Need Editors and Proofreaders?

Why do all authors need editors and proofreaders? Because each of these professionals plays a different (and essential) role in polishing your book for publication.

Why do all authors need editors and proofreaders?

Traditional Forms of Editing

Traditional literary publishers put each and every manuscript through a thorough and professional process of substantive/stylistic editing, copy editing, and then proofreading to ensure a polished and saleable result. There are several pairs of eyes on every raw manuscript and galley proof all the way through the process to ensure that 99 percent of every last error is caught and corrected before it goes to print.

Below is a brief description of what each of those editing processes looks like. Independent authors should have your manuscripts copy edited in the very least.

Copy Editing

A copy editor will thoroughly review your manuscript in Microsoft Word format and correct any issues with spelling, grammar, and punctuation throughout. He or she will also make helpful suggestions regarding word choice and sentence structure, using the “Western-based” English editorial style guide of your choice. The edited version will be returned to you for final approval before moving onto the next publishing stage.

Stylistic Editing

Sometimes, you want a little more than a copy edit. A stylistic edit will cover all the points of a copy edit, plus it will eliminate jargon and redundancies, clarify meaning, and ensure that the writing matches the intended audience. Stylistic edits are negotiated with you all along the way using the English editorial style guide of your choice. The edited version will be returned to you for final approval before moving onto the next publishing stage.

Substantive/Structural Editing

Do you want the help of a professional editor to improve the overall structure of your manuscript? A substantive edit will cover all the points of a stylistic edit, plus it will clarify and reorganize your story for you. These changes are negotiated with you all along the way using the English editorial style guide of your choice. The edited version will be returned to you for final approval before moving onto the next publishing stage.

Professional Proofreading

Where an editor’s job is to review and improve an author’s raw manuscript, and the graphic designer’s job is to arrange that raw edited text into a professional and appealing layout, a professional proofreader provides yet another set of eyes to ensure all the components fit together properly and the book is ready for public viewing and printing. The proofreader’s job is to complete the following nine-point check for you:

Interior Check

  • The front matter (such as the table of contents) is accurate and correct.
  • The back matter (such as the index) is accurate and correct.
  • Headers and footers are accurate and correct.
  • Bad breaks, widows, and orphans are eliminated.
  • Text is kerned to flow smoothly throughout.
  • Margins and trim size all measure properly.
  • Spelling and punctuation is correct.

Cover Check

  • Spacing, bleeds, and trim size all measure properly.
  • Spelling and punctuation is correct.

As shown in the above list, a professional proofreader is someone who is knowledgeable/experienced with both basic language editing (spelling and punctuation) as well as the technical aspects of book design (kerning, bleeds, trim size, et cetera). If the proofreader finds any issues in the layout, he or she will indicate these. And the graphic designer will make those corrections with your approval.

Why Do All Authors Need Editors and Proofreaders?

In the traditional publishing sector, you will have very little to no say in the design and polishing of your book. Once they buy the rights to your manuscript from you, they own it. They have all the say in every aspect of the project.

That said, in both the independent and hybrid book publishing business models, you can accept and decline each change as you see fit. And I’m willing to bet you’ll accept 95% of these professionals’ changes—if not more. You’ll be amazed by what their eyes will find that you were unable to see after viewing your own book cover and interior several times over. I’m certain you’ll be grateful that you invested in this type of support.

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